Cup City




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Cup City


Occasionally my mother would take me into Town. She would dress me in my best clothes and we would catch the bus from our suburban home to the Town’s centre, St Georges Terrace; a street lined with British colonial and provincial American styled architecture. After my mother paid bills, did her shopping and collected my brother’s and sister’s comic book order, we would have lunch at the Coles’ or Boans’ cafeteria. I remember the wrought iron stair cases of the department stores, the elevators with their uniformed operators and the sucking sound of the Lamson pneumatic tubes shooting canisters of till receipts and cheques from floor to floor. Through a child’s eyes, our Town of the 1950s was a remarkable place. Although, as I grew older, I realised that what was most remarkable about our town was that it was one of the most isolated cities in the world. It was also one of the windiest. But the wind proved to be useful. During the summer of 1987 our town, despite its isolation, hosted the international yacht race; The America’s Cup. The Cup brought changes and restaurants were permitted to have tables on the sidewalks. ACDC singer Bon Scott grew up in Cup City. Bon’s grave is here too.

Kevin Ballantine